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May 2018

Because It’s Time: Unraveling Race and Place in NM

May 4, 2018January 28, 2019

Art Museum hours and prices HERE

Now, you can also purchase the catalog for this incredible exhibit.

Because It’s Time: Unraveling Race and Place in NM examines race and identity in New Mexico and is a space for artistic expression that grapples with the complexities of who we are, how we are understood, and how that impacts the way we live (or don’t) in a variety of places.  The exhibition features approximately 26 newly created artworks by artists with different experiences in New Mexico alongside works from the National Hispanic Cultural Center Art Museum’s permanent collection. All of the artworks delve into  race and place through an intersectional lens alongside gender, sexuality, class, nationality, citizenship status, etc. from local, national, and international perspectives.

This museum exhibition included much contemplation by the Visual Arts program staff and interns about what it might look like to create an exhibit that relinquished a bit of institutional control and placed it in the hands of the artists. Many of the works were not seen in their completed form until just weeks before the opening. The process continues to be a learning experience and the hope is to maintain an environment of openness and education, for the staff and our visitors, even after the exhibition closes.

We are so honored to work with this amazing group of artists.

Invited artists include: Adelina Cruz, Adriana Ortiz-Carmona, Apolo Gomez Autumn Chacon, Aziza Murray, Baochi Zhang, Brandee Caoba, Corey Pickett, Cynthia Cook, Earl McBride, Ehren Kee Natay, Eliza Naranjo Morse, Eric-Paul Riege, Erin Currier, Fatemeh Baigmoradi, Grace Rosario Perkins, Hamed Marwan, Jami Porter Lara, Jessica Chao, Joanna Keane Lopez, John Boyce, Lucrecia Troncoso, Monica Kennedy, Nanibah Chacon, Rose B. Simpson, and Zahra Marwan.

Artists from the permanent collection include: Ana Laura de la Garza, Annie Lopez, Asamblea de Artistas Revolucionarios de Oaxaca (ASARO), Carlos Cortéz, Consuelo Jiménez Underwood, Delilah Montoya, Eduardo Muñoz Bachs, Eric J. Garcia, Ester Hernández, Jason Garcia, Nicolás de Jesús, Noni Olabisi, Pamela Enriquez-Courts, Rosana Paulino, Rupert Garcia, Scherezade Garcia, Vincent Valdez, Yreina D. Cervantez.

Artwork credits: Clockwise from upper left: Corey Pickett, Las Mujeres (1 of 3), 2018. Wood, foam, fabric, repurposed purses. Approximately 83” h. x 108” w. x 6” d; Zahra Marwan, The desert knows me well, the night, the paper, and the pen (1 of 2), 2018. Watercolor and ink on paper. Two panels, approximately 11” h. x 15” w. each; Erin Currier, New Mexico Guadalupe, 2018. Mixed-media collage and acrylic on panel. Approximately 48” h. x 36” w; Ehren Kee Natay, Listening, 2018. Digital photography and  dye-sublimation on aluminum. Approximately, 30” h. x 24” w.

January 2019

Braceros Exhibit

January 25June 30

This exhibition features more than 30 black and white photographs of braceros taken by the photojournalist collective known as the Hermanos Mayo. It also uses narratives, video and artifacts to tell the story of the Bracero Program. The program grew out of a series of bi-lateral agreements between Mexico and the United States, bringing Mexican men to the United States as guest-workers on short-term, primarily agricultural labor contracts. In 1942, these workers came to remedy wartime production shortages by supplying much-needed labor during the early years of World War II.  The Bracero Program, which derived its name from the Spanish word for a manual laborer, “bracero” continued uninterrupted until 1964. During this extensive program, 4.6 million contracts were signed, with many individuals returning several times on different contracts, making it the largest United States contract labor program. An examination of the exhibition images, documents, and artifacts contributes to our understanding of the lives of migrant workers in Mexico and the United States, as well as our knowledge of immigration, nationalism, labor practices, and race relations.
This exhibit is free and open to the public 

March 2019

Qué Chola

March 8August 4

The Chola is a significant figure in the Latina imagination for the ways that she represents a feminine strength, power, and resilience in the face of racial, gender, and economic adversity. She is a figure that many young Latinas in the U.S. admire and emulate. The last few years have seen a surge in interest in the Chola as a figure and this exhibition will explore this dynamic from a feminist perspective through art and popular culture.

June 2019

Southwest of Eden: The Art of Adam and Eve

June 7November 17

Southwest of Eden:  The Art of Adam and Eve

NHCC Art Museum Community Gallery

This exciting exhibit features approximately sixty works of art from the Joyce Kaser Collection. Southwest of Eden:  The Art of Adam and Eve examines the various ways in which New Mexican artists and others visually portray  these two famous figures as well as the flora and fauna in their surroundings.   For example, how many apples are featured, or are they pomegranates?  Is the serpent male or female?  Is it animal or human, or half-and half? Is Eve always the instigator, or is Adam assuming some responsibility?  Situated in the NHCC Art Museum’s highly popular community gallery, Southwest of Eden invites the visitor to take a closer look at the imagery, symbolism and the story of what happened in the garden.

September 2019

El Perú: Art in the Contemporary Past

September 8, 2019May 31, 2020

Curated by Dr. Tey Marianna Nunn , Director and Chief Curator of the NHCC Art Museum, the exhibit  El Perú: Art in the Contemporary Past, will aim to break down stereotypes of what visitors expect to see in a “Peruvian art exhibit.” The exhibit will highlight works by 20th and 21st century Peruvian artists, all of whom explore the Peruvian pre-colonial and colonial past while addressing race, class and inclusion in the contemporary present.  Works include photography, sculpture, ceramics, painting, and multimedia.

There is a growing Peruvian community in New Mexico and throughout the southwest (not to mention the United States).  This will be the NHCC Art Museum’s first exhibit to showcase Peruvian visual arts and the museum greatly looks forward furthering appreciation of Peru by sharing the inherent nuances of this incredible country and its artists.

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