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  • La Canoa Legacy Talks: Genízaro Ethnogenesis, Emergence, and Futurism

    March 17, 2018

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La Canoa Legacy Talks: Genízaro Ethnogenesis, Emergence, and Futurism

March 17, 2018

2 pm – 4 pm
In collaboration with UNM Center for Regional Studies

Join Associate Professor Moises Gonzales, from the University of New Mexico’s School of Architecture and Planning, as he relates the emerging story of the history, identity, and cultural evolution of the genízaro people of New Mexico during the March La Canoa Legacy Talk.

As defined by Fray Angelico Chavez, genízaro was the designation given to North American Indians of mixed tribal derivation living among the Hispanic population in Spanish fashion: that is, having Spanish surnames from their masters and Christian names through baptism, speaking a simple form of Spanish, and living together or sprinkled among the Hispanic towns and ranchos. Today the permanence of genízaro identity blurs the lines of distinction between Native and Hispanic frameworks of race and cultural affiliation. The talk will discuss the emergence of contemporary indigenous cultural production and futurism generated by genízaros in New Mexico, as well as the collective work of New Mexican genízaro scholars compiled in a forthcoming anthology co-edited by Gonzales.

Moises Gonzales is Associate Professor of Urban Design in Community and Regional Planning at the School of Architecture and Planning at the University of New Mexico. He is a genízaro heir of both the Cañón de Carnué Land Grant and the San Antonio de Las Huertas land grant. Gonzales also currently serves on the Board of Trustees of the Carnué Land Grant, and has written various academic articles on the history and culture of genízaro settlements in New Mexico. He is a danzante in the Matachín and Comanche traditions of the Sandia mountain communities, and co-editor, with Dr. Enrique Lamadrid, of Genízaro Nation: Ethnogenesis, Place, and Identity in New Mexico, to be released by UNM Press in 2018.
Free public event

Presented in collaboration with Center for Regional Studies: http://crsinfo.unm.edu/.