¡Globalquerque! International Cinema Series: Treeless Mountain/Namueopneun San (U.S./South Korea)

7 pm

In September, the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series showcases the ¡Globalquerque! International Cinema Series, presented in partnership with ¡Globalquerque!, New Mexico’s Fourteenth Celebration of World Music and Culture, returning to the NHCC on September 21 & 22. Films in the series are from countries whose artists are represented in this year’s festival.

When their mother leaves to find their estranged father, six-year-old Jin and her younger sister Bin are left to live with their Big Aunt for the summer. With only a small piggy bank and their mother’s promise to return when it is full, the two young girls count the days and the coins, eagerly anticipating her homecoming. But when the bank is full, and their mother is still not back, Big Aunt decides that she can no longer tend to the children, and they are taken to live on their grandparents’ farm, where Jin comes to learn the importance of family bonds.
2008; So Yong Kim; Korean with English subtitles; 89 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

¡Globalquerque! International Cinema Series: Alma and Hombre de Barro (Spain)

12:45 pm & 1 pm

In September, the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series showcases the ¡Globalquerque! International Cinema Series, presented in partnership with ¡Globalquerque!, New Mexico’s Fourteenth Celebration of World Music and Culture. Films in the series are from countries whose artists are represented in this year’s festival.

Alma: Arte, Legado y Medio Ambiente/Spirit: Art, Legacy and Environment
This U.S. premiere is a musical-visual journey to the remote area of La Ribeira Sacra in Galicia, Spain, where four musicians participated in an arts residency that allowed them to tune into the ancient forests and steep river canyons before performing before an audience in a 12th century Benedictine monastery. ALMA is a mobile residency program that facilitates experiences for artists to co-create in direct connection with nature. 2017; directed by Victor Hugo Espejo; Spanish with English subtitles; 14 minutes; not rated.

Hombre de Barro: Wapapura en el Amazonas/Man of Clay: Wapapura in the Amazon This documentary follows the Wapapura crew on a journey into the Colombian Amazon rainforest to record the debut album of Bogota-based trio Hombre de Barro. These three musicians, who have all played prominent roles in other Colombian bands, are leaders in the movement to research, promote, and re-engage ancient musical styles from the Americas. The film, recorded by a mobile solar-powered studio, was made at the invitation of the non-profit Fundación Raíces Vivas, which empowers indigenous youth through artistic expression and training in the use of multimedia technology. 2013; directed by Rafael Kotcherha Campora; Spanish with English subtitles; 23 minutes; not rated.
Free public event

¡Globalquerque! International Cinema Series: Latcho Drom (France)

2 pm

In September, the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series showcases the ¡Globalquerque! International Cinema Series, presented in partnership with ¡Globalquerque!, New Mexico’s Fourteenth Celebration of World Music and Culture. Films in the series are from countries whose artists are represented in this year’s festival.

Latcho Drom, meaning “Safe Journey,” is a visual depiction and historical record of Romany life, told through musicians and dancers of India, Egypt, Turkey, Romania, Hungary, Slovakia, France, and Spain. The journey moves from India to Spain, dramatizing the nomadic nature of Romany culture and the variety of conditions in which the Romany people live, and takes place over a year’s time, from summer through fall and winter to spring. Via song and dance, young and old celebrate essential cultural values that have developed over countless generations and in diverse countries. The film illustrates similarities in travel habits, musical instruments and rhythms, and song themes, including celebration of travel and perceived rejection by sedentary locals. 1993; directed by Tony Gatlif; partial English translation of some songs (no dialogue or narration); 103 minutes; not rated.
Free public event

¡Globalquerque! International Cinema Series: Clash (Egypt)

7 pm

In September, the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series showcases the ¡Globalquerque! International Cinema Series, presented in partnership with ¡Globalquerque!, New Mexico’s Fourteenth Celebration of World Music and Culture, returning to the NHCC on September 21 & 22. Films in the series are from countries whose artists are represented in this year’s festival.

Cairo, summer of 2013, two years after the Egyptian Revolution. Following the ousting of former president Morsi from power and a day of violent riots, dozens of demonstrators with diverse political and religious convictions are locked together in a patrol wagon. Will they be able to overcome their differences in order to escape?
2016; Mohamed Diab; Arabic with English subtitles; 97 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

¡Globalquerque! International Cinema Series: Mustang (France/Turkey)

7 pm

In September, the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series showcases the ¡Globalquerque! International Cinema Series, presented in partnership with ¡Globalquerque!, New Mexico’s Fourteenth Celebration of World Music and Culture, returning to the NHCC on September 21 & 22. Films in the series are from countries whose artists are represented in this year’s festival.

When five orphaned teenage sisters are seen playing innocently on the beach with their male classmates, and reported to their guardians by a prying neighbor, the conservative family essentially imprisons the girls, removing all “instruments of corruption” like cell phones and computers, and subjecting them to endless lessons in housework in preparation for arranged marriages. As the oldest sisters are married off, the younger ones bond together to avoid the same fate.
2015; Deniz Gamze Ergüven; Turkish with English subtitles; 97 minutes; rated PG-15.
Free ticketed event with tickets available one hour prior to the screening

¡Cine Magnífico! Albuquerque’s Latino Film Festival 2018: Matar a Jesus / Killing Jesus

7 pm

Paula, a young Colombian student, witnesses the cold-blooded murder of her father. After facing the inefficiency of the police, she accidentally crosses paths with the hitman who did the job. Driven by her anger, frustration and pain, the choice of revenge seems to be the only possible reaction… But what if both of them are the victims of a violent and corrupt system? Inspired by true events

Un par de meses después del asesinato de su padre, Paula, una joven de 22 años se cruzará con Jesús, el sicario que disparó a su padre. A partir de este momento se verá forzada a definir los límites de su propia humanidad. El encuentro entre víctima y agresor revelará cuánto cuesta matar a un hombre, especialmente cuando el otro es el reflejo de uno mismo: una víctima más.  

Laura Mora | Colombia/Argentina | 2018 | Ficción/Drama | 99 min | NM Premiere | Spanish with English subtitles
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

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Film: The Search for General Tso

7 pm

August screenings in the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series conclude Becoming American: A Documentary Film and Discussion Series on our Immigration Experience. This six-week series is a project of City Lore, a cultural center for the arts and humanities based in New York City. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of NEH’s Community Conversations initiative, and features documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions designed to encourage an informed discussion of immigration issues against the backdrop of our immigration history.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center is one of 24 organizations selected nationwide to participate in the Becoming American project. The scholar/moderator for the screenings and discussions at the Center is Dr. Gabriel Sanchez, Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. The theme for Unit Six, presented on August 23, is “Immigration and Popular Culture.”

As much an immigration history as a culinary detective story, this ebullient documentary uses the ubiquitous Americanized dish, General Tso’s Chicken, as a lens onto a larger story of immigration, adaptation, and innovation to American popular culture. Early on, the film poses the question, “If Chinese Americans comprise only 1% of the U.S. population, why are there Chinese restaurants in almost every city across America?” The filmmakers seek the answer in a journey through the Chinese American experience from the Gold Rush and the building of the railroads to the age of Panda Express. On-air historians, chefs, writers, and enthusiasts provide accounts of the history of Chinese migration to America; the discriminatory 1880s Chinese Exclusion Act that forced emigrants out of the labor market and into small business ownership; the modification of “exotic” Chinese cuisine for American tastes; and the role of Chinese American community organizations in the dissemination of restaurants to the far corners of the nation to avoid competition and discrimination on the West Coast.
2014; Ian Cheney; English; 57 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: My American Girls

7 pm

August screenings in the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series conclude Becoming American: A Documentary Film and Discussion Series on our Immigration Experience. This six-week series is a project of City Lore, a cultural center for the arts and humanities based in New York City. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of NEH’s Community Conversations initiative, and features documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions designed to encourage an informed discussion of immigration issues against the backdrop of our immigration history.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center is one of 24 organizations selected nationwide to participate in the Becoming American project. The scholar/moderator for the screenings and discussions at the Center is Dr. Gabriel Sanchez, Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. The theme for Unit Five, presented on August 9, is “Family and Community.”

Filmed over the course of a year, this documentary follows the family of Sandra and Bautista Ortiz, hardworking immigrants living frugally in a multi-family house in Brooklyn, who dream of retiring to their native Dominican Republic. Their American-born and acculturated daughters have other ideas altogether. The conflict between the first generation’s values — attachment to their homeland, discipline and strong work ethic, clarity of goals and emphasis on family – and the independent outlook of their three girls form the moving and often humorous dramatic spine of the film.
2001; Aaron Matthews; English; 62 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Destination America

7 pm

July screenings in the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series continue Becoming American: A Documentary Film and Discussion Series on our Immigration Experience. This six-week series is a project of City Lore, a cultural center for the arts and humanities based in New York City. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of NEH’s Community Conversations initiative, and features documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions designed to encourage an informed discussion of immigration issues against the backdrop of our immigration history.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center is one of 24 organizations selected nationwide to participate in the Becoming American project. The scholar/moderator for the screenings and discussions at the Center is Dr. Gabriel Sanchez, Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. The theme for Unit Four, presented on July 26, is “Help Wanted: Immigration and Work.”

“If you could get here, you could stay.” In Episode 1, “The Golden Door,” of Destination America, historians Donna Gabaccia and Janet Nolan provide an historical context for America’s long-conflicted relationship with immigrant labor. The film focuses on three groups: the Irish, who fled starvation at home in the mid-19th century and penetrated the urban workforce and helped build America’s railroads; the Norwegians, who came to farm the Midwest when land ran out in their country; and the Mexicans, many of whom were recruited by American industry in the 1920s as labor for American mills and factories, and then expelled when no longer needed.
2005; Stephen Stept and David Grubin; English; 54 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: The New Americans

7 pm

July screenings in the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series continue Becoming American: A Documentary Film and Discussion Series on our Immigration Experience. This six-week series is a project of City Lore, a cultural center for the arts and humanities based in New York City. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of NEH’s Community Conversations initiative, and features documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions designed to encourage an informed discussion of immigration issues against the backdrop of our immigration history.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center is one of 24 organizations selected nationwide to participate in the Becoming American project. The scholar/moderator for the screenings and discussions at the Center is Dr. Gabriel Sanchez, Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. The theme for Unit Three, presented on July 12, is “Between Two Worlds: Identity and Acculturation.”

Episode 1, “The Nigerians,” of The New Americans documents the struggles of the Nwidor family, Nigerians forced to flee their homes because of military oppression. Israel, a former chemical engineer, his wife Ngozi and their two children have waited for resettlement for years in a refugee camp in Benin. They share their hopes and humorously acknowledge their exaggerated expectations of new life in America. In their first weeks in low-income housing in Chicago, they are grateful for a dry place to sleep and their first McDonald’s hamburgers, but find much of their new world confusing. Both parents struggle with low-paying jobs in the hotel industry, and the expectations of their family in Nigeria to send money home regularly. We watch as their attempts to adapt and succeed crumble at times into despair, but also share with them moments of hope as they struggle to attain their American Dream. Director Steve James was co-producer of the acclaimed documentary Hoop Dreams,
2004; Steve James; English; 34 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show