Film: The Fight in the Fields: César Chávez and the Farmworkers’ Struggle

7 pm

A documentary recounting the history of César Chávez and the farmworkers’ movement—a story of hope and courage against overwhelming odds, and a story of poor people taking control of their lives. Chávez, the charismatic co-founder, with Dolores Huerta, of the United Farmworkers Union, inspired a nonviolent movement that touched the hearts of millions and confronted both conservative politicians and the powerful Teamsters Union. The Fight in the Fields is the first film to cover the full arc of César Chávez’s life, using archival footage, newsreel, and present-day interviews with Ethel Kennedy, former California Governor Jerry Brown, Dolores Huerta, and Chávez’s brother, sister, son, and daughter. Presented as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.

1996; Ray Telles & Rick Tejada-Flores; English; 116 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Dolores

7 pm

One of the most important, yet least known activists of our time, Dolores Huerta was an equal partner in founding the first farmworkers’ union with César Chávez. Tirelessly leading the fight for racial and labor justice, Huerta evolved into one of the most defiant feminists of the 20th century—and she continues the fight to this day, in her late 80s. Dolores chronicles Huerta’s life from her childhood in Stockton, California to her early years with the United Farm Workers, from her work with the headline-making grape boycott launched in 1965 to her role in the feminist movement of the ’70s, to her continued work as a fearless activist, willing to accept the personal sacrifices involved in committing one’s life to social change. The film features interviews with Gloria Steinem, Luis Valdez, Angela Davis, Hillary Clinton, and Huerta’s children, among others. Presented in partnership with New Mexico PBS as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.

2017; Peter Bratt; English; 95 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Ella Es el Matador

7 pm

There is a long and surprising history of women fighting in the Spanish bullring—and fighting to have the chance to do so. Maripaz Vega, a Spaniard, is currently the world’s only professional female matador and is on the verge of achieving top ranking. Eva Florencia, a young runaway from Italy, is a neophyte driven by a childhood dream. Both women must deal with the legacies of sexism in Spanish bullfighting, yet the passions that propel them are similar to those of male bullfighters—a drive to express themselves in a grand and peculiarly Spanish rite that is at once sport, dance, theatre, and blood ritual. Through interviews shot in vérité style interspersed with archival footage, the film offers a window on the highly choreographed and deadly match between bull and human that remains enormously popular in Spain, even as it is reviled by many in an age of animal rights. Presented in partnership with New Mexico PBS as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.

2009; Gemma Cubero & Celeste Carrasco; English; 60 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Chavela

7 pm

Born in Costa Rica to pious parents who were embarrassed by their boyish daughter, Isabel Vargas Lizano ran away to Mexico City to sing on the streets. At the peak of her initial popularity in the 1950s, dressed in a poncho, she interpreted the mournful, yearning repertoire of canción ranchera without altering the female pronouns. Her Madrid concert premiere in the 1990s, following years in rural isolation as an impoverished alcoholic, brought her into contact with Pedro Almodóvar, who helped his “idol” fulfill a dream of performing in Paris. She had just returned to performing when she agreed to a 1991 interview with filmmaker Gund; much of Chavela was filmed in that year. Despite a public persona as “the most macha of the machos,” Vargas was still not entirely comfortable with identifying openly as a lesbian at the time of filming. She ultimately confirmed her sexual orientation in 2000 at the age of 81. Presented in partnership with Instituto Cervantes as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.

2017; Catherine Gund & Daresha Kyi; English; 93 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: María Moliner: Tendiendo Palabras

7 pm

Born in Zaragoza, Spain in 1900, María Moliner is known for her great work, the Diccionario de Uso del Español. A librarian and lexicographer, she began compiling the dictionary in 1952, working on it in the morning and evening before and after her regular hours of employment. Moliner’s approach was to look up words, read newspapers, and note words that she had heard in the street, in an effort to create a resource that would be more comprehensive than the dictionary published by the Real Academia Española. To this end, her dictionary, first published in 1966-1967 and republished twice since, contained detailed definitions, synonyms, expressions, and families of words. The film follows the important events in Moliner’s life, highlighting the terms that define them and using the definitions that she herself offers in her work. Presented in partnership with Instituto Cervantes as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.

2017; Vicky Calavia; Spanish with English subtitles; 70 minutes; rated PG.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Nasario Remembers the Río Puerco

7 pm

A new documentary follows celebrated folklorist Nasario García doing what he loves: wandering through landscape and memory amid the ghost towns of New Mexico’s Río Puerco valley, reviving recuerdos (memories) of his youth when the ranching villages thrived and viejitos (elders) told stories beside a river that once ran. Through interviews with Dr. García, oral histories, archival photos, and footage of the landscape, Nasario Remembers the Río Puerco poses the question: do ruins remember us? Presented as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.

Filmmaker Shebana Coelho and folklorist and author Nasario García will be present at the screenings of the film to discuss it with the audience. A short prelude of poetry and music will include a poem read by García and Coelho and a performance of the “Indita del Río Puerco,” written by Coelho for the film, by Lara Manzanares and Lone Piñon’s Jordan Wax and Noah Martinez.

2017; Shebana Coelho; English; 60 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Red Sky at Morning

7 pm

Based on the novel by Richard Bradford, Red Sky at Morning follows an adolescent boy who is relocated with his mother to Corazón Sagrado, New Mexico when his father goes off to World War II. Finding himself a minority in a predominantly Latino community, Josh Arnold must deal with adjusting to a new land and a new culture, making friends, and experiencing first love, as well as the war that is always in the background and ultimately threatens everything he has come to know. Presented as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.
1971; James Goldstone; English; 112 minutes; rated PG.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Cariños

7 pm

Cariños, a serialized cinematic experience from visionary auteur Christopher Michael Roybal, examines who, how, and why people love. The film follows a group of New Mexicans throughout 2017 as they collide in unconventional and unexpected ways, all while trying both to uncover and to keep hidden secrets that could change their lives forever. Cariños is unique because there are two distinct versions of this experimental fictional drama. The first version played out over the course of 2017 and broke the film into 53 individual scenes, or episodes, that premiered weekly online until its conclusion on the last day of the year. The second version, premiering tonight, compiles all of the episodes into a single, unified feature film that asks viewers if there is actually any one right way to love. Cariños contains adult language and content, and may not be suitable for all audiences. Presented as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.

Christopher Michael Roybal will be present at the screening to discuss the film with the audience.

2017; Christopher Michael Roybal; English; 120 minutes, not rated (suggested R rating).
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Bless Me, Ultima

7 pm

The screen adaptation of Rudolfo Anaya’s iconic work, set in the 1940s in rural New Mexico, about a young boy and the mysterious healer who opens his eyes to the wonders of the spiritual realm. As the entire world is plunged into war and Antonio Marez grapples with the harsh realities all around him, his life is forever changed by the sudden arrival of Ultima, a curandera who inspires him to see the world from a new perspective. Presented as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.
2011; Carl Franklin; English; 102 minutes; rated PG-13.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Since the extremely high level of interest in this film, first screened on January 18, exceeded the seating capacity of the Bank of America Theatre, we have scheduled a second screening for January 25.  Please note that Red Sky at Morning, originally scheduled for this date, will be screened at a later date.

Film: Bless Me, Ultima

7 pm

The screen adaptation of Rudolfo Anaya’s iconic work, set in the 1940s in rural New Mexico, about a young boy and the mysterious healer who opens his eyes to the wonders of the spiritual realm. As the entire world is plunged into war and Antonio Marez grapples with the harsh realities all around him, his life is forever changed by the sudden arrival of Ultima, a curandera who inspires him to see the world from a new perspective. Presented as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.
2011; Carl Franklin; English; 102 minutes; rated PG-13.

Bless Me, Ultima is shown in preparation for the world premiere of a new opera, also based on Rudolfo Anaya’s novel and produced as a partnership between Opera Southwest and the National Hispanic Cultural Center. The operatic version of Bless Me, Ultima will come to the NHCC stage in late February.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show