¡Cine Magnífico! Albuquerque’s Latino Film Festival 2018: Matar a Jesus / Killing Jesus

7 pm

Paula, a young Colombian student, witnesses the cold-blooded murder of her father. After facing the inefficiency of the police, she accidentally crosses paths with the hitman who did the job. Driven by her anger, frustration and pain, the choice of revenge seems to be the only possible reaction… But what if both of them are the victims of a violent and corrupt system? Inspired by true events

Un par de meses después del asesinato de su padre, Paula, una joven de 22 años se cruzará con Jesús, el sicario que disparó a su padre. A partir de este momento se verá forzada a definir los límites de su propia humanidad. El encuentro entre víctima y agresor revelará cuánto cuesta matar a un hombre, especialmente cuando el otro es el reflejo de uno mismo: una víctima más.  

Laura Mora | Colombia/Argentina | 2018 | Ficción/Drama | 99 min | NM Premiere | Spanish with English subtitles
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

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Film: The Search for General Tso

7 pm

August screenings in the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series conclude Becoming American: A Documentary Film and Discussion Series on our Immigration Experience. This six-week series is a project of City Lore, a cultural center for the arts and humanities based in New York City. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of NEH’s Community Conversations initiative, and features documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions designed to encourage an informed discussion of immigration issues against the backdrop of our immigration history.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center is one of 24 organizations selected nationwide to participate in the Becoming American project. The scholar/moderator for the screenings and discussions at the Center is Dr. Gabriel Sanchez, Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. The theme for Unit Six, presented on August 23, is “Immigration and Popular Culture.”

As much an immigration history as a culinary detective story, this ebullient documentary uses the ubiquitous Americanized dish, General Tso’s Chicken, as a lens onto a larger story of immigration, adaptation, and innovation to American popular culture. Early on, the film poses the question, “If Chinese Americans comprise only 1% of the U.S. population, why are there Chinese restaurants in almost every city across America?” The filmmakers seek the answer in a journey through the Chinese American experience from the Gold Rush and the building of the railroads to the age of Panda Express. On-air historians, chefs, writers, and enthusiasts provide accounts of the history of Chinese migration to America; the discriminatory 1880s Chinese Exclusion Act that forced emigrants out of the labor market and into small business ownership; the modification of “exotic” Chinese cuisine for American tastes; and the role of Chinese American community organizations in the dissemination of restaurants to the far corners of the nation to avoid competition and discrimination on the West Coast.
2014; Ian Cheney; English; 57 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: My American Girls

7 pm

August screenings in the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series conclude Becoming American: A Documentary Film and Discussion Series on our Immigration Experience. This six-week series is a project of City Lore, a cultural center for the arts and humanities based in New York City. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of NEH’s Community Conversations initiative, and features documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions designed to encourage an informed discussion of immigration issues against the backdrop of our immigration history.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center is one of 24 organizations selected nationwide to participate in the Becoming American project. The scholar/moderator for the screenings and discussions at the Center is Dr. Gabriel Sanchez, Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. The theme for Unit Five, presented on August 9, is “Family and Community.”

Filmed over the course of a year, this documentary follows the family of Sandra and Bautista Ortiz, hardworking immigrants living frugally in a multi-family house in Brooklyn, who dream of retiring to their native Dominican Republic. Their American-born and acculturated daughters have other ideas altogether. The conflict between the first generation’s values — attachment to their homeland, discipline and strong work ethic, clarity of goals and emphasis on family – and the independent outlook of their three girls form the moving and often humorous dramatic spine of the film.
2001; Aaron Matthews; English; 62 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Destination America

7 pm

July screenings in the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series continue Becoming American: A Documentary Film and Discussion Series on our Immigration Experience. This six-week series is a project of City Lore, a cultural center for the arts and humanities based in New York City. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of NEH’s Community Conversations initiative, and features documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions designed to encourage an informed discussion of immigration issues against the backdrop of our immigration history.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center is one of 24 organizations selected nationwide to participate in the Becoming American project. The scholar/moderator for the screenings and discussions at the Center is Dr. Gabriel Sanchez, Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. The theme for Unit Four, presented on July 26, is “Help Wanted: Immigration and Work.”

“If you could get here, you could stay.” In Episode 1, “The Golden Door,” of Destination America, historians Donna Gabaccia and Janet Nolan provide an historical context for America’s long-conflicted relationship with immigrant labor. The film focuses on three groups: the Irish, who fled starvation at home in the mid-19th century and penetrated the urban workforce and helped build America’s railroads; the Norwegians, who came to farm the Midwest when land ran out in their country; and the Mexicans, many of whom were recruited by American industry in the 1920s as labor for American mills and factories, and then expelled when no longer needed.
2005; Stephen Stept and David Grubin; English; 54 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: The New Americans

7 pm

July screenings in the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series continue Becoming American: A Documentary Film and Discussion Series on our Immigration Experience. This six-week series is a project of City Lore, a cultural center for the arts and humanities based in New York City. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of NEH’s Community Conversations initiative, and features documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions designed to encourage an informed discussion of immigration issues against the backdrop of our immigration history.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center is one of 24 organizations selected nationwide to participate in the Becoming American project. The scholar/moderator for the screenings and discussions at the Center is Dr. Gabriel Sanchez, Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. The theme for Unit Three, presented on July 12, is “Between Two Worlds: Identity and Acculturation.”

Episode 1, “The Nigerians,” of The New Americans documents the struggles of the Nwidor family, Nigerians forced to flee their homes because of military oppression. Israel, a former chemical engineer, his wife Ngozi and their two children have waited for resettlement for years in a refugee camp in Benin. They share their hopes and humorously acknowledge their exaggerated expectations of new life in America. In their first weeks in low-income housing in Chicago, they are grateful for a dry place to sleep and their first McDonald’s hamburgers, but find much of their new world confusing. Both parents struggle with low-paying jobs in the hotel industry, and the expectations of their family in Nigeria to send money home regularly. We watch as their attempts to adapt and succeed crumble at times into despair, but also share with them moments of hope as they struggle to attain their American Dream. Director Steve James was co-producer of the acclaimed documentary Hoop Dreams,
2004; Steve James; English; 34 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Welcome to Shelbyville

7 pm

June screenings in the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series initiate Becoming American: A Documentary Film and Discussion Series on our Immigration Experience. This six-week series is a project of City Lore, a cultural center for the arts and humanities based in New York City. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of NEH’s Community Conversations initiative, and features documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions designed to encourage an informed discussion of immigration issues against the backdrop of our immigration history.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center is one of 24 organizations selected nationwide to participate in the Becoming American project. The scholar/moderator for the screenings and discussions at the Center is Dr. Gabriel Sanchez, Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. The theme for Unit Two, presented on June 28, is “Promise and Prejudice.”

The powerful documentary Welcome to Shelbyville focuses on a small Tennessee town in the heart of the Bible Belt as it grapples with discrimination in the face of changing demographics. Shelbyville’s long-time residents are challenged with how to best integrate the recent arrival of hundreds of Somali refugees of Muslim faith, hired by the local Tyson chicken-processing plant. As the town erupts in controversy, we hear from all parts of the community: Latino workers grappling with their own immigrant identity; longtime African American residents balancing perceived threats to their livelihood against the values they learned from their own civil rights struggles; the Somali refugees attempting to make new lives for their families and maintain their dignity in a hostile new land; and white civic and church leaders who are attempting to guide their congregations and citizens through a period of unprecedented change.
2010; directed by Kim A. Snyder; English; 66 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: New York: A Documentary Film and The Jewish Americans

7 pm

June screenings in the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series initiate Becoming American: A Documentary Film and Discussion Series on our Immigration Experience. This six-week series is a project of City Lore, a cultural center for the arts and humanities based in New York City. It is funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities as part of NEH’s Community Conversations initiative, and features documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions designed to encourage an informed discussion of immigration issues against the backdrop of our immigration history.

The National Hispanic Cultural Center is one of 24 organizations selected nationwide to participate in the Becoming American project. The scholar/moderator for the screenings and discussions at the Center is Dr. Gabriel Sanchez, Professor of Political Science at the University of New Mexico. The theme for Unit One, presented on June 14, is “The Century of Immigration.”

Episode 4, “The Power and the People,” of New York: A Documentary Film examines the great wave of immigration that began in the late 19th century, tripled New York’s population, and transformed the city and the nation. On camera, renowned historians like David McCullough and writers like Pete Hamill describe the new tide of humanity from southern and eastern Europe—Italians, Poles, Turks, Hungarians, Ukrainians, Greeks—their reasons for migrating, their passage through Ellis Island, their life on the Lower East Side, and their role in transforming America into an industrial nation.
2004; directed by Ric Burns; 30 minutes; English; not rated.

Episode 2, “A World of Their Own,” from the award-winning series The Jewish Americans explores in depth the story of one of the groups that made up the great wave of immigration described above. Fleeing poverty and oppression in Eastern Europe, over two million Jews flooded into America, drawn by the promise of religious freedom and economic opportunity. Many migrated across the U.S., but the majority created a new life in Manhattan’s slums. Struggling to adapt their traditions to their new life, they were aided by new ethnic institutions such as The Forward, a newspaper which devoted columns to teaching newcomers American mores, in often unintentionally humorous ways.
2008; directed by David Grubin; English; 30 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Requisitos para ser una persona normal

7 pm

Maria has turned 30 years old, and now she has an immediate goal in life: to become a normal person, rather than the peculiar person she considers herself to be. But first she has to discover what this implies. Is she already a normal person? What, exactly, does it mean to be normal? As she ponders these questions, she creates a list of the requirements, and embarks on a journey to attain them all. From Instituto Cervantes’ Espacio femenino series; presented in partnership with Instituto Cervantes as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.
2015; Directed by Leticia Dolera; Spanish with English subtitles; 81 minutes; not rated.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Film: Riot Girls: Españolas en corto

7 pm

Four short films curated by the online magazine Cortosfera.es and demonstrating the growing importance of female directors in this genre. From Instituto Cervantes’ Espacio femenino series; presented in partnership with Instituto Cervantes as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series; Spanish with English subtitles.
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show

Miss Wamba
A woman tormented by her past meets an old man with whom she immediately connects.
2017; directed by Estefanía Cortés; 17 minutes; not rated.

Oasis
Nieves gets a job as the superintendent of a decaying apartment complex in New York City. But the job becomes more difficult than she anticipated when she discovers a disturbing secret in one of the units.
2014; directed by Carmen Jiménez; 15 minutes; not rated (suggested R rating).

Sara a la fuga
At 15 years old, Sara has been living for some time in a shelter for minors. Although he has promised to go see her, she has not seen her father for years, and has learned the lesson that she is completely alone in the world. Her tutor, Núria, will do everything in her power to help her.
2015; directed by Belén Funes; 15 minutes; not rated (suggested PG-13 rating).

Waste
A small community of young women is subjected to a series of strange rules and rituals, in which a pencil manipulated by the group leader guides the actions of the group. This routine is interrupted by the death of one of the members and the subsequent confrontation of the leader by the victim’s closest friend.
2016; directed by Petra Garmon; 16 minutes; not rated.

Film: La Novia

7 pm

Based on Federico García Lorca’s play Bodas de Sangre (Blood Wedding), La Novia, set in Spain in the early decades of the 20th century, is the story of a multi-family, multi-generational blood feud that is about to be settled by a wedding uniting two of the families. But Fate and Death have other plans, as an ill-starred love triangle precipitates an impetuous act, and sets into motion a chain of events that will have devastating consequences. From Instituto Cervantes’ Espacio femenino series; presented in partnership with Instituto Cervantes as part of the Bank of America Free Thursday Film Series.
2015; Directed by Paula Ortiz; Spanish with English subtitles; 93 minutes; not rated (recommended R or PG-13 rating).
Free ticketed event; tickets available one hour before show