• La Canoa: Under the Canopy of the Cottonwoods of Alameda

    December 16

  • ¡HAH! Happy Arte Hour

    February 1, 2018

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    February 3, 2018

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June 2017
Fountain Beauty Shot

La Canoa: Narrating the Manito Trail in Wyoming and Arizona

2 pm

Join Vanessa Fonseca, Assistant Professor, English – Arizona State University; Levi Romero, Assistant Professor, Chicana and Chicano Studies – University of New Mexico; and Trisha Martínez, Ph.D. Student, American Studies – University of New Mexico, as they discuss the Manito Trail.

This is an interdisciplinary ethnographic project documenting Hispanic New Mexican, or Manito, migration from New Mexico to different parts of the United States from the 1850’s to the present. Looking at the many major migration routes of Manito families, this project focuses on the driving factors for Manito migration and the exploration of querencia, or how one establishes a sense of self and community through place. For this talk, we will speak about our experiences along the Manito Trail in both Wyoming and Arizona and offer some historical and community perspectives gained from our work with Manito communities who left New Mexico in search of employment and opportunity.
Free community event

Mestizos.1

Reading & Booksigning: Robert Con Davis-Undiano, Mestizos Come Home! Making and Claiming Mexican American Identity

6 pm to 8 pm

Join author Robert Con Davis-Undiano for a reading from his recently released book, Mestizos Come Home! Making and Claiming Mexican American Identity.

Davis-Undiano’s landmark book details the profound ways in which Mexican Americans have contributed to U.S. culture since the 1960s. It addresses the need for Mexican Americans and Latinos to stop apologizing for being in the U.S., as well as the need for mainstream culture to stop making them the “enemy.” The intent of the work is to encourage Latinos to take pride in what they have accomplished already, and to help others to be more understanding of what Mexican Americans and other Latinos are continuing to try to accomplish.

Robert Con Davis-Undiano is a Mexican American and a professor/administrator at the University of Oklahoma.
Free public event

August 2017
Kings+of+7th+Avenue+eimage

Reading & Booksigning: Jonathan Marcantoni, Kings of 7th Avenue and Tristiana

2 pm to 4 pm

Join author Jonathan Marcantoni, who will be traveling to Albuquerque from Colorado, for an interactive reading event, drawing from the material in his books Kings of 7th Avenue and Tristiana.

Kings of 7th Avenue takes an unflinching look at Tampa’s multi-ethnic communities to show how the roots of misogyny and abuse have grown so deep that they have become tradition, tracing the meteoric rise of one couple and the violent fall of another against the backdrop of Tampa’s infamous Ybor City club district. Tristiana, Marcantoni’s first Spanish-language novel, explores a beautiful and troubled land where a group of men and women debate between the playful comfort of the world of ideas and the cruel reality of political violence. The epic of these “Tristianos,” embodied in paintings and murals—transcends the lines connecting the struggles of the past and the dreams of a free future.
Free public event

October 2017
Pinata Exhibit box

The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) Artist Meet and Greet: Isaías Rodríguez (aka the Little Piñata Maker)!

October 7

2 pm to 4 pm

Please join us for a very special opportunity to meet artist Isaías Rodríguez (aka the Little Piñata Maker)! You don’t want to miss this very special opportunity to meet artist Isaías Rodríguez (aka the Little Piñata Maker) who will be leading a tour of The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!). In addition Isaías Rodríguez (aka the Little Piñata Maker)! Will be holding a trunk show and sale.

Isaías spent the last ten years capturing the fun and creativity of traditional piñatas but on a mini scale. All of his little piñatas are no bigger than 3-4 inches and each one is unique. You can learn more about Isaías and his work on his website HERE.

The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) celebrates this popular art form with over 175 examples from Mexico, California, Arizona, Nevada, Texas and New Mexico. Traditional and iconic works, alongside creations by contemporary piñata artists, illustrate how piñatas maintain their historical and social importance while also reflecting transnational shifts in popular, political, and visual culture.
Free with the price of museum admission

BeneathTheSuperMoon_frontCover

Reading & Booksigning: Irene Blea, Beneath the Super Moon

2 pm to 4 pm

Join author Irene Blea for a reading from her book Beneath the Super Moon.

The third book in Blea’s “Suzanna” trilogy, Beneath the Super Moon follows Suzanna Montoya from the mid-1960s, in the early days of the Chicano Movement, as she has settled in the city, developed a critical consciousness, and begun to address urban concerns about race, class, and gender. Suzanna’s analytical gift provides a colorful voice as she takes action to address the manifestations of racism, sexism, and class discrimination where they happen—in her life—all while she seeks to reunite with the sons she left behind when she ran from her abusive husband.
Free public event

November 2017
Escritor GDL2

Reading & Booksigning: Pablo Brescia, The Defeat of the Real, and Santiago Vaquera-Vásquez, En el Lost y Found

2 pm to 4 pm

Join Pablo Brescia as he reads from his book La derrota de lo real/The Defeat of the Real (Miami and Mexico, 2017) and Santiago Vaquera-Vásquez as he reads from his book En el Lost y Found (2016).

Pablo Brescia makes us see that what is created by literature can be, at the same time, fictional and present within us. Some stories deconstruct reality, others assemble worlds playing with detective fiction or science fiction; some are ironic, others satiric; some refer back to Wilcock and Bolaño, others to Borges. In these stories, Brescia’s narrative pulse proves to be necessary by helping us capture reality’s insane ways.

Santiago Vaquera-Vásquez is an unrepentant border crosser, ex-dj, Xicano writer, painter, and academic. An Associate Professor of Creative Writing and Hispanic Southwest Literatures and Cultures in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at the University of New Mexico, he is recently back in New Mexico after a year as a Fulbright Senior Lecturer in Ankara, Turkey. He has also taught and lectured at universities across the United States, Latin America, and Europe. A member of the research group UC-Mexicanistas.

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lalo.alcaraz

Celebrity tour of The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) with Lalo Alcaraz

November 10

6 pm to 7:30 pm

Come enjoy a special tour of the NHCC Art Museum’s The Piñata Exhibit (Sure to be a Smash Hit!) conducted by Lalo Alcaraz on November 10, 2017 from 6-7:30 pm. Lalo is the author of the comic La Cucaracha, a nationally syndicated, politically themed Latino daily comic strip, and was a consulting producer and writer on the animated show Bordertown. In addition, Lalo served as a cultural consultant on the Disney/Pixar film Coco. Following the museum tour, Lalo will have prints available for sale.
Free with a suggested $5 donation to the museum

Fountain Beauty Shot

La Canoa: Legacy Talks: The Myth of Tri-Cultural Harmony: Ethnic/Sexual Personas in the Tri-Cultural Land of Enchantment

3:30 pm

Join us for an examination of New Mexico’s public ideology of tri-culturalism, which holds that the state consists of three separate ethnic groups living together in harmony.

Chris Wilson, Professor of Cultural Landscape Studies at the University of New Mexico School of Architecture and Planning will discuss the myth, developed in the 1880s as part of the campaign to make New Mexico a state, and crystalized in the early 20th century with the rise of mass tourism. The primary visual expression of this rhetoric—found in both public art and tourism promotional literature—is a set of ethnic personas. Occupying the middle ground between racial stereotypes and mythic archetypes, these popular cultural types—like the iconography of the saints before them—are recognizable through attributes of costume, arts and crafts, skin color and facial type, tools and modes of transportation. When linked to assumptions about technological progress, occupational status and, above all, gender roles, these images also encapsulate and endorse a particular vision of social hierarchy.
This is a free public event

December 2017
The Art of Luis Tapia

Reading & Booksigning, Borderless: The Art of Luis Tapia

December 2

2 pm to 4 pm

Join us for a panel discussion and book signing celebrating Borderless: The Art of Luis Tapia, a new book that documents pioneering Chicano artist Luis Tapia’s 45-year career in art. The first full-length study of Tapia’s work, Borderless delves deep into his artistic legacy as a celebrated and influential figure in Chicano and New Mexican art, from the early 1970s to today. Leading art historians, curators, and literary figures consider Tapia’s refined craftsmanship and insightful commentary to be visual and social touchstones for a tradition in transition. Contributors include Dana Gioia, Charlene Villaseñor Black, Lucy R. Lippard, Denise Chávez, Edward Hayes, and Director and Curator of the NHCC Art Museum, Tey Marianna Nunn.
Free with a suggested $5 donation to the museum

Fountain Beauty Shot

La Canoa: Under the Canopy of the Cottonwoods of Alameda

December 16

2 pm

Dr. Jerry Gurule, Professor at the College of Arts and Sciences, Department of Spanish and Portuguese UNM will present us with a vivid look at the community of Alameda.

Join us on a journey of discovery of the community of Alameda explored through history and anecdotes. Alameda was vitally linked to the Río Grande that supplied the essence of life to it and its sister communities of Los Ranchos, Corrales and Sandía Pueblo. This is, in part, a visual journey of the past and present interwoven among the “alamos” of the area. These were communities filled with their share of rapscallions and heroes, but communities we fondly referred to as “mi gente,” a people with a deep appreciation of the space they occupied.
This is a free public event

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